A Special Interview with Meghan Telpner to talk Undiet!

A Special Interview with Meghan Telpner to talk Undiet!

Meghan Telpner Book Covers

I sat down recently with the amazing Meghan Telpner to discuss her new book Undiet and how it can impact the youth of our world! You do not want to miss this as it is jammed pack with relevant and inspiring information for youth and anyone who has a youth in their lives! If you want to learn more about Meghan and her new book please check out the following links:

Website: http://meghantelpner.com/

Book: http://meghantelpner.com/books/undiet-meghan-telpner/

 

Michael: Bring yourself back to when you were a teenager, what are the main things you would do different when it comes to nutrition and what you put in your body?

Meghan: I would care about it! When I was a teenager I didn’t cook, at all. I didn’t even cook through university. I didn’t think it was that important. I think a lot of younger people feel this way- that there are other things that are just more important. Had I known at the time how the food I eat would set a foundation for my health in later years, I definitely would have given more energy to it.  If someone had told me that by eating whole foods, my brain would work better, my body would look and feel different, my mood would be more uplifted and I wouldn’t be exhausted at the end of each day- I would have done things differently.  I would drink more water, learn to find ways that I enjoyed eating vegetables and really take an interest in what I was using to fuel my body.

Michael: What are some simple ways that youth in high school and university can apply the wisdom of Undiet to their lives?

Meghan: UnDiet is about the simple and easy things we can do everyday that add up to great health impact! It’s important to remember that it’s the little, simple things that make the biggest difference. Making sure we take time everyday to move our bodies a little. If we’re going to drink alcohol and coffee, we should be having two glasses of water for every one drink or coffee. Make a point of having fresh fruit and vegetables around as easy snacking options. Try and maintain a regular sleep schedule that is as consistent as possible during the week and on weekends. And sleep! Get enough sleep, preferably at night, not in the afternoon.

It’s also really important to find a stress reduction practice that works for you. This may be a more formal meditation or yoga practice, an affirmation, a breathing technique, going for a walk, listening to certain music. Find that thing that really works for you that helps you cope with stress in a positive way. Stress can easily become the trigger that causes us to drink too much, smoke too much, eat too much, not be able to sleep or get into heated conversations.

Michael: Put yourself in the shoes of a mother of young kids, how would you go about prepping meals for your kids and family that are healthy and not so time consuming? Is that even possible?

Meghan: That is absolutely possible! UnDiet shares fantastic tips and strategies on how to optimize time in the kitchen. It involves a little more time at first- getting accustomed to new ways of organizing your kitchen, planning meals, shopping and veggie prepping. Once that bit is out of the way, preparing meals on a daily basis is so simple. This strategy also allows moms and dads to have a plan in place so kids can take on and own tasks that are part of the meal planning and preparing. When we can get kids into the kitchen with us, they become more engaged in their food, and when they feel a part of it, having contributed to a dish, they have a sense of pride. We have to be careful not to over schedule our kids- especially around dinner time. A family dinner 4-5 nights our of 7 each week is going to instil far more positive habits, better family connection and health than after school activities everyday of the week.

Michael: What are the biggest challenges you faced as a teenager? How could what you know now have helped your teenage self?

Meghan: Looking back is not always an easy thing to do. Being a teenager is hard.

I had low self-esteem and expressed it by gossiping a lot, saying bad things about others in an effort to make myself feel better- which it never did. At my core, it always made me feel worse, and often left me as the one who was isolated. This also led me to be in relationships that weren’t healthy, where I didn’t feel secure and didn’t ever trust my partner, often with good reason.

I think often as teenagers, while we’re still trying to work out who we are, instead we spend a lot of time trying to be who we think our friends want us to be. It’s hard to be someone else all the time.  I know that practices that teach stress management and connection to ourself like meditation and yoga would have benefited my teenage self, but even knowing what it has done for me as an adult, I don’t know that I would have been open to embracing it then. Perhaps the best thingI could share with my younger self would simply be- It will all make sense and be okay. Trust in that!

In UnDiet, I share the ten lessons I learned healing an incurable disease. I think to some extent, these are the lessons we learn when we go through any challenges- knowing to take others opinions with a grain of salt, if we sit through the storms, the sunshine and rainbows will follow if we’re looking, and trust your own intuition. In UnDiet, I also talk a lot about finding the support we need when we are going through a transition- the support from those who truly want to see us succeed. I know for myself that in my teens, I had lots of friends who truly loved and supported my successes and stood by for the challenges, but there also loads I tried to hang on to that were not looking out for my best interests. It’s sometimes hard to know for sure, but that’s where those lessons come in.

I guess the one lesson that would have changed it all would be that being happy and healthy is so much more important than being a straight A student and/or being cool. None of that matters once you walk out of those high school doors for the last time.

Michael: If you are the only one in your family that follows the wisdom of your book Undiet, and you want to help them see the light, what are the best ways to do so?

Meghan: Lead by example! We can’t force anyone to do anything- especially make eating and lifestyle changes. We have to take care of ourselves first- like on the airplane when they say to put your own mask on first. Often times we sell ourselves short simply in the effort to make others feel better. This is not a helpful habit. If we can lead example, live the UnDiet way consistently, with openness, honesty, integrity and joy in the process, those that want to join along will when they are ready. It all must be done completely free of judgement which is a theme that runs through the whole book. No one needs to feel bad ever for where they are at. All we need to know for ourselves is to honour ourselves by doing our best everyday, and that will vary everyday, and to also know that every choice counts. After that, they will have to decide for themselves what they want.

Book: http://meghantelpner.com/books/undiet-meghan-telpner/

Michael: Bring yourself back to when you were a teenager, what are the main things you would do different when it comes to nutrition and what you put in your body?

Meghan: I would care about it! When I was a teenager I didn’t cook, at all. I didn’t even cook through university. I didn’t think it was that important. I think a lot of younger people feel this way- that there are other things that are just more important. Had I known at the time how the food I eat would set a foundation for my health in later years, I definitely would have given more energy to it.  If someone had told me that by eating whole foods, my brain would work better, my body would look and feel different, my mood would be more uplifted and I wouldn’t be exhausted at the end of each day- I would have done things differently.  I would drink more water, learn to find ways that I enjoyed eating vegetables and really take an interest in what I was using to fuel my body.

Michael: What are some simple ways that youth in high school and university can apply the wisdom of Undiet to their lives?

Meghan: UnDiet is about the simple and easy things we can do everyday that add up to great health impact! It’s important to remember that it’s the little, simple things that make the biggest difference. Making sure we take time everyday to move our bodies a little. If we’re going to drink alcohol and coffee, we should be having two glasses of water for every one drink or coffee. Make a point of having fresh fruit and vegetables around as easy snacking options. Try and maintain a regular sleep schedule that is as consistent as possible during the week and on weekends. And sleep! Get enough sleep, preferably at night, not in the afternoon.

It’s also really important to find a stress reduction practice that works for you. This may be a more formal meditation or yoga practice, an affirmation, a breathing technique, going for a walk, listening to certain music. Find that thing that really works for you that helps you cope with stress in a positive way. Stress can easily become the trigger that causes us to drink too much, smoke too much, eat too much, not be able to sleep or get into heated conversations.

Michael: Put yourself in the shoes of a mother of young kids, how would you go about prepping meals for your kids and family that are healthy and not so time consuming? Is that even possible?

Meghan: That is absolutely possible! UnDiet shares fantastic tips and strategies on how to optimize time in the kitchen. It involves a little more time at first- getting accustomed to new ways of organizing your kitchen, planning meals, shopping and veggie prepping. Once that bit is out of the way, preparing meals on a daily basis is so simple. This strategy also allows moms and dads to have a plan in place so kids can take on and own tasks that are part of the meal planning and preparing. When we can get kids into the kitchen with us, they become more engaged in their food, and when they feel a part of it, having contributed to a dish, they have a sense of pride. We have to be careful not to over schedule our kids- especially around dinner time. A family dinner 4-5 nights our of 7 each week is going to instil far more positive habits, better family connection and health than after school activities everyday of the week.

Michael: What are the biggest challenges you faced as a teenager? How could what you know now have helped your teenage self?

Meghan: Looking back is not always an easy thing to do. Being a teenager is hard.

I had low self-esteem and expressed it by gossiping a lot, saying bad things about others in an effort to make myself feel better- which it never did. At my core, it always made me feel worse, and often left me as the one who was isolated. This also led me to be in relationships that weren’t healthy, where I didn’t feel secure and didn’t ever trust my partner, often with good reason.

I think often as teenagers, while we’re still trying to work out who we are, instead we spend a lot of time trying to be who we think our friends want us to be. It’s hard to be someone else all the time.  I know that practices that teach stress management and connection to ourself like meditation and yoga would have benefited my teenage self, but even knowing what it has done for me as an adult, I don’t know that I would have been open to embracing it then. Perhaps the best thingI could share with my younger self would simply be- It will all make sense and be okay. Trust in that!

In UnDiet, I share the ten lessons I learned healing an incurable disease. I think to some extent, these are the lessons we learn when we go through any challenges- knowing to take others opinions with a grain of salt, if we sit through the storms, the sunshine and rainbows will follow if we’re looking, and trust your own intuition. In UnDiet, I also talk a lot about finding the support we need when we are going through a transition- the support from those who truly want to see us succeed. I know for myself that in my teens, I had lots of friends who truly loved and supported my successes and stood by for the challenges, but there also loads I tried to hang on to that were not looking out for my best interests. It’s sometimes hard to know for sure, but that’s where those lessons come in.

I guess the one lesson that would have changed it all would be that being happy and healthy is so much more important than being a straight A student and/or being cool. None of that matters once you walk out of those high school doors for the last time.

Michael: If you are the only one in your family that follows the wisdom of your book Undiet, and you want to help them see the light, what are the best ways to do so?

Meghan: Lead by example! We can’t force anyone to do anything- especially make eating and lifestyle changes. We have to take care of ourselves first- like on the airplane when they say to put your own mask on first. Often times we sell ourselves short simply in the effort to make others feel better. This is not a helpful habit. If we can lead example, live the UnDiet way consistently, with openness, honesty, integrity and joy in the process, those that want to join along will when they are ready. It all must be done completely free of judgement which is a theme that runs through the whole book. No one needs to feel bad ever for where they are at. All we need to know for ourselves is to honour ourselves by doing our best everyday, and that will vary everyday, and to also know that every choice counts. After that, they will have to decide for themselves what they want. 

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